Serrano Peppers

The serrano chili pepper is a smaller version of the jalapeno pepper, similar in color, but smaller, about 1 to 4 inches long on average and 1/2 inch wide. They generally grow between 1 – 4 inches long and about 1/2 inch wide though they have been known to grow longer.

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Cubanelle Peppers

The Cubanelle is considered a sweet pepper, although its heat can range from mild to moderate. Cubanelles are usually picked before they ripen, while they are a yellowish-green color, but when ripe, they turn bright red. They are usually about 4-6 inches long, 2 inches wide, and banana-shaped, tapering near the bottom. The skin should be glossy, and the pepper should be smooth and firm. Cubanelles are also called the Italian Frying Pepper, because they are great in a frying pan with a little olive oil.

Habanero Peppers

Before maturity the habanero is green, but as it ages its coloring ranges from yellow-orange to orange to bright red, depending upon when its harvesting occurs, and it can even appear pink or dark brown. Its size ranges from 1 to 2 1/2 inches in length and from 1 to 2 inches in diameter, and its shape, like that of the Scotch bonnet, can be compared to that of a Scottish Tam o’ Shanter hat. Both types of pepper also typically have flesh that is thin and wax.

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Long Hot Peppers

Italian long hot peppers have one of the longer maturity times for most varieties, ranging from 72 to 120 days. The pepper itself, however, is on the average size, with thin walls and a length of eight inches and width of three-quarters of an inch. During maturity, the fruit for all Italian long hot peppers changes from green to red and, taste-wise, all pepper have a mild but somewhat spicy flavor. Plant these with 18 inches apart in your garden and in rows with 30 inches in between.

Poblano Peppers

The poblano is an extremely popular chili pepper. 4 inches long, very dark green in color, ripening to dark red or brown.
How do you pronounce poblano? puh-BLAH-noe.
Poblano peppers are mild peppers, quite large and are somewhat heart-shaped. Their skins/walls are very thick, making them perfect for stuffing as they’ll hold up in the oven quite nicely. They are typically roasted and peeled when cooking with them, or dried. When dried, they are called ancho chilis.
Poblanos originated in Puebla, Mexico, and one of the most popular peppers grown there. The poblano plant is multi-stemmed and can reach up to 25 inches high. The pods are 3-6 inches long and 2-3 inches wide. Immature poblano peppers are deep purple-green in color, and eventually turn dark red and black as they age. They are closely related to the mulato chili.

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Jalapeno Peppers

A jalapeno pepper is a fuit of the Capsicum pod type. It is a medium sized pepper when compared to other chili pepper, measuring an average of 2-3.5 inches in length but growing up to 6 inches long or longer. While originating in Mexico, it is now grown worldwide for it’s popular flavor and mild heat level, which averages around 5,000 Scoville Heat Units. That is hot, but not too hot.
You’ll find them served when green, but if you leave the jalapeno pepper on the plant long enough, it will turn red. The red variety are just as delicious as the green jalapeno pepper, though a touch sweeter.
A mature jalapeno pepper plant measures 2-3 feet in height and will typically produce around 30-40 jalapeno pepper pods. If you grow them in your own garden, pick them regularly, as the plant will continue to produce.

Anaheim Peppers

A mild, medium sized chili pepper that grows to 6-10 inches, often used when green, though it can be used when red. The basic variety ripens to a dark green/reddish color, but other strains ripen to full red. They are one of the most common chilis in the United States and are used in many foods and recipes. Red varieties can be strung together and dried to make ristras.

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